Hummingbird Species


Hummingbirds are found only in the Western Hemisphere, with almost half the species living in the "equatorial belt" between 10 degrees north and south of the equator.

Hummingbird Species in the United States and Canada

The hummingbird family is very large, with over 330 species and 115 genera, mostly south of the U.S. Hummingbirds are found only in the Western Hemisphere, with almost half the species living in the "equatorial belt" between 10 degrees north and south of the equator.

Hummingbirds comprise the family Trochilidae, among the smallest of birds, with most species measuring in the 3"-5" range.

Many hummingbirds spend the winter in Central America or Mexico, and migrate north to their breeding grounds in the southern U.S. as early as February, and to areas further north later in the spring. The first arrivals in spring are usually males.

Fewer than two dozen species venture into the U.S. and Canada, and only a few species remain year-round.

List of the Most Common Hummingbird Species Found in the U.S.A.

Common Name and
Scientific Name
Photo

Allen’s
Selasphorus sasin

Photos, size, distribution and features

Allen's Hummingbird in Southern California
Source: Marilyn Meadows Photography
Facebook | Fine Art America
Anna's Hummingbird in California
Source: Marilyn Meadows Photography
Facebook | Fine Art America

Berylline
Amazilia beryllina

Photos, size, distribution and features

Berylline Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Black-chinned
Archilochus alexandri

Photos, size, distribution and features

Black-Chinned Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Blue-throated
Lampornis clemenciae

Photos, size, distribution and features

Blue-Throated Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Broad-billed
Cynanthus latirostris

Photos, size, distribution and features

Broad-billed Hummingbird
Source: Staff Photo

Broad-tailed
Selasphorus platycercus

Photos, size, distribution and features

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Buff-bellied
Amazilia yucatanensis

Photos, size, distribution and features

Buff-Bellied Hummingbird
Source: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Calliope
Stellula calliope

Photos, size, distribution and features

Calliope Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Costa’s
Calypte costae

Photos, size, distribution and features

Costa's Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Green-breasted Mango
Anthracothorax prevostii

Photos, size, distribution and features

Green-Breasted Mango Hummingbird

Lucifer
Calothorax lucifer

Photos, size, distribution and

Lucifer Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Mexican Violetear
Colibri thalassinus

Photos, size, distribution and features

Mexican Violetear Hummingbird
Source: Rolf Riethof

Rivoli's
Eugenes fulgens

Photos, size, distribution and features

Rivoli's Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

Ruby-throated
Archilochus colubris

Photos, size, distribution and features

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Source: Sina Norris

Rufous
Selasphorus rufus

Photos, size, distribution and features

Rufous Hummingbird in Santa Fe, New Mexico
Source: Ken Mock

Violet-crowned
Amazilia violiceps

Photos, size, distribution and features

Violet-Crowned Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer

White-eared
Hylocharis leucotis

Photos, size, distribution and features

White-Eared Hummingbird
Source: Alan Schmierer


Hummingbird Moth
Source: Author's Photo Archives

The Hummingbird "Look Alike"

Hummingbird Moth or
Hummingbird Hawk Moth
or Sphinx Moth

Although not a member of the hummingbird family, it hovers and hums like a hummingbird

Photos, size, distribution and features


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