About This Website


Hummingbird hovering at feeder in Texas

Why Another Hummingbird Website?

We've experienced a love of nature for years and continue to develop our landscape and nature preserve. And we remain committed to the preservation of our natural environment!

The design of our nature preserve provides enjoyment to us humans, as well as food and shelter for hummingbirds, songbirds, butterflies, and other wildlife.

With the wealth of information about hummingbirds already on the web in many great websites, why would anyone create yet another one?

The reason is fairly simple ... we love hummingbirds, and are still learning about them at this "advanced" age. This website helps organize our knowledge and focuses us on learning even more.

We've learned more about hummingbirds in the past five years than we did in the previous 60 years! And we're learning along with our granddaughters, who also share our love of nature and the marvelous mysteries and lore of the hummingbird.

There are undoubtedly others who are just beginning their journey toward understanding and attracting hummingbirds. Maybe this site will help them. For those who are more experienced and knowledgeable, there are many fine websites for them.

We continue to learn, and to photograph, and present our knowledge on this website in a quick, understandable, and easy-to-read format, with links to more detailed hummingbird resources for those readers who require more in-depth information and species identification tips.

About Our Environment

Our preserve features a number of different ecological environments. Located in the country, it backs up to hundreds of acres of forest, with nearby fields, pastures, and wetlands. It is registered by MonarchWatch.org as a certified Monarch Waystation.

We share our environment with birds, foxes, raccoons, snakes, armadillos, deer, skunks, turtles, coyotes, bobcats, and possums. During the warm months we enjoy countless varieties of butterflies, and Ruby-Throat Hummingbirds.

The landscape includes a variety of native trees such as oak, elm, river birch, maple, gum, pine, cedar, and dogwood. Under the tree canopy we find Beauty Berries, Pokeweed, Devil's Walking Sticks, Wax Myrtles, cactus, and ferns.

The native plantlife is complemented with additional annuals, perennials, flowering shrubs and vines. We've included in our gardens several types of Lantana, Zinnias, Butterfly Bushes, Pentas, Salvia, Batface Cuphea, Nasturtiums, Coreopsis, other annuals and perennials.

We also plant generous amounts of dill and fennel to provide food sources for Black Swallowtails, and Milkweed for Monarch butterflies.